Home Virus safety Australia’s Covid-19 vaccine rollout numbers: vaccination progress state-by-state, daily doses tracker and live data | Australia news

Australia’s Covid-19 vaccine rollout numbers: vaccination progress state-by-state, daily doses tracker and live data | Australia news

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Australia’s coronavirus vaccine rollout began in late February. Here we bring together the latest figures to track the progress of the rollout, as well as presenting an interactive tool to show when you might be eligible to receive the vaccine.

Australia coronavirus latest totals

Vaccine rollout

One of the biggest logistical exercises in Australia’s history, the delivery of coronavirus vaccines to more than 20 million people has begun.

The government was hoping to have 4 million people vaccinated by March and the entire country inoculated by October.

Here, you can see the current rate of vaccination compared with the rate of doses we would have needed to meet the government’s goals for the early stages of the rollout, with the initial goal of 60,000 doses in the first week followed by 4m doses by the end of March. This assumes a linear rate of increase, but it’s quite likely the speed of vaccinations will ramp up as the rollout proceeds:

The vaccine rollout is not uniform across Australia, as the state and federal governments have divided the task between them.

The following chart shows how many doses have been administered per 100 people in each jurisdiction.

Note that the Australian rollout rate is higher than the sum of the state rates as vaccinations in GP clinics and aged and disability care are counted at the federal government level.

Australia state vaccine rollout progress vaccination doses per 100 people in Victoria, NSW, Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania, Northern Territory, ACT

In the following two charts you can see how Australia’s vaccine rollout compares with other countries, in terms of doses administered per 100 people.

This first chart adjusts for the fact that countries started administering vaccines on different dates. It shows how Australia compares to select countries at equivalent points in their vaccine rollouts.

Australia vaccine tracker: rollout indexed by first day

Here you can see how those same countries are doing across their entire vaccine rollout, on a doses administered per 100 people basis. Some are already more than halfway to vaccinating their populations.

Australia vaccine tracker: complete rollout for select countries

When will I get the vaccine?

The timing for when you should expect to get the vaccine is dependent on who you are, how old you are and what you do for work. The government has released an interactive tool that takes into account all the factors that will determine which phase of the vaccine rollout you will be in.

You can check your eligibility for the vaccine rollout using our interactive tool, which uses the government’s data:

Latest coronavirus statistics

Guardian Australia has gone through every state and territory press release to construct and maintain an up-to-date database of coronavirus cases, as well as maintaining live data feeds from other groups collating data.

This chart shows the “epidemic curve” for Australia, showing the progress in “flattening the curve” and how effective various measures have been in suppressing the outbreak:

daily new Covid cases in Australia: coronavirus vaccine tracker

Here, you can see the number of new deaths reported per day by the states and territories:

Covid deaths per day Australia: coronavirus vaccine tracker

This chart shows the cumulative total of confirmed cases, with the contribution of each state and territory:

Cumulative total of Australian coronavirus covid-19 cases state by state update
  • Due to the unprecedented and ongoing nature of the coronavirus outbreak, this article is being regularly updated to ensure that it reflects the current situation at the date of publication. Any significant corrections made to this or previous versions of the article will be footnoted in line with Guardian editorial policy.



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